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WILLIAM STRANG

1859-1921

 

 

PARADISE LOST 1896
A BOOK OF BALLADS AND ETCHINGS 1898
BARON MUNCHAUSEN
ETCHING, ENGRAVING AND OTHER METHODS OF PRINTING PICTURES
THE PRAISE OF FOLIE
PILGRIM'S PROGRESS
SINDBAD AND ALI BABA
THE CHRIST UPON THE HILL
THE EARTH FIEND
THIRTY ETCHINGS AFTER KIPLING
THIRTY ETCHINGS AFTER CERVANTES 1902
 
WESTERN FLANDERS
A BOOK OF GIANTS 1898 (sequence)
A BOOK OF GIANTS 1898 (single spread)

 

VARIOUS PRINTS

 

 

 

“Strang was a short, ruddy, broad shouldered, thickset Lowlander with a strong Scottish accent and a forehead like a bull, above which, the hair grew stiff and strong like a southern Frenchman’s. He was a staunch admirer of Legros: this was evident in his drawings and etchings. He had much of Legros’ remarkable power of design; his drawing was solid and energetic, and he showed a grim and lusty inventiveness in the composition of his subjects. He was an admirably equipped artist, and, at a time when the Glasgow School was becoming fashionable, he was for long under-estimated. In spite of a real curiosity for life, and a fertile imagination, an element of pastiche sometimes crept into his work, an infection caught perhaps from Legros.  He was an ardent experimenter in many materials and methods – what he admired he at once attempted to do himself… He had just completed a set of etchings for The Pilgrim’s Progress and complained that no publisher would take them; they all wanted prettier things. He said he never used models for his subject etchings.”

William Rothenstein, Men and Memories, 1931/2 Volume 1 p34. Rothenstein studied at the Slade (1886-1893) under Legros who gave him an introduction to Strang, his most accomplished ex-student.

Many thanks to Michael T. Ricker who has made his collection available.

 

 

 

 

 

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