ARE YOU SITTING COMFORTABLY? - A LECTURE FOR GRAFIL

 

THE SALESMAN - A SCREEN OF POSSIBILITIES

DRAWING IN PUBLIC, THE LIGHTNING CARTOONIST (LOUIS VALENTINE)

THE CHILD PERFORMER - SINGLE IMAGE 1954

Public Lecture on Morality - SINGLE IMAGE etching 1786 Daniel Chodowiecki

THE THEATRICAL PROMPTER

THE MEDIUM - IN CHARACTER AT THE SEANCE

HOW NOT TO TELL A STORY, Bennett Cerf

VIS-IBILITY, SIGHT GAGS 1955 , Val Andrews

Gluyas Williams, Raconteurs, 1938

THE READER, SINGLE IMAGE C1895

STRIKE! American Mutual 1940, picture of orator

THE QUIZMASTER, Bert Parks 1947

NARRATIVE BY WHISPERING, Please Keep this Confidential (single) ETHYL 1942 ,

AFTER DINNER SPEAKING, Graham Simmons, The Passing Show 1921

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When someone is depicted imparting information,

How is it to be shown clearly?
What are the options for pose and expression ?
How is the audience to be shown ?
How does the environment frame the event ?
Can it be a Point of View ?

Recommended examples of good practice ;

John Houseman's Creepy Tale at the beginning of John Carpenter's The Fog .
Mr.Pink in Tarentino's Reservoir Dogs who tells of being in a lavatory carrying drugs whenthe Police appear. The narrator appears in his own story telling that story.
The Narrator in Sondheim's Into the Woods who is finally dragged into the narrative and sacrificed to a woman giant.

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THE HYPNOTIST
Linley Sambourne's satirical attack on new experiments in hypnotism supported by The Times newspaper, Punch January 21st 1893 p.26, 18 x 24cms. from S.J.van Pelt, Hypnotism and the Power Within, Skeffington, London, 1950. The faces are airbrushed out to preserve confidentiality.

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RHETORICThe Arte of Rhetorick, Thomas Walton, titlepage, a classic handbook.

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ELDERS AND BETTERS

advert for BOHN Aluminium and Brass 20 x 24 May 1953

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COMMENTATOR

ABOVE Byrum Saam - Atlantic's Ace Announcer in the commentary box with his two professional spotters

THE ANNOUNCERS BBC STAFF - FRANK PHILLIPS, LIONEL MARSON, ALVAR LIDDELL, ROBIN HOLMES, ALAN SKEMPTON, ROBERT DOUGAL, COLIN DORAN - SINGLE IMAGE

BBC STAFF COMMENTATORS 1952

MARY MALCOLM, ANNOUNCER 1952

BBC COMMENTATORS at the Coronation 1952

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THE RUMOUR


right, H.M.Bateman, "The Adventures of a Rumour" (UK) , 1920.

left, Taber's cartoon of idle chatter c1960 (US)

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THE MUSICAL PERFORMER

How do we represent the performer ?

TOP ROW

01 a characteristic pose for the singing of Country and Western Music. c1958 Dress - campy Pose - artificial Expression - dum but laughing Facial muscles - tense for high pitched whine. The tilt of the pelvis suggests he is proud of his guitar or about to fart.

02 Edward Wadsworth, one of the British Vorticist group, an etching of a singer performing (with similar pretensions) c1923.  

03 a singer and his accompanist from Karl Storck's collection of caricatures and satires after Music and Musicians c1910  

04 a description of Frankie Laine 1958

 

BOTTOM ROW

left - from George Bickham's Musical Entertainer London 1736 - 1740.
 

right James Hook, A Complete Book of Instruction for Beginners on the Harpsichord, London c1800

How do we suggest in the still image -
the unwinding of the performance
the posture of the participants
the atmosphere and milieu ?
 

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THEATRICAL PERFORMANCE

How do we represent the performer ? The Japanese Dimension.

THE KABUKI THEATRE, Masonobu, a scene of performance, Japan 1740

Sharaku, Portrait of an actor, 1794 (Japanese print)

Shunsho , Portrait of the actor Danjuro 1770, (Japanese print)

Kunisada , Portrait of two actors c1860(Japanese print)

Kunisada, An Actor playing a Cat , 1852 (Japanese print)



SERMONISING - THE ECCLESIASTICAL NARRATIVE

01 Savonarola preaching, from COMPENDIO DI REVELAZIONE , Morgiani and Petri, Florence 1495 one of five woodcuts called the Triumphs of Savonarola, Among the congregation are distinct signs of turbulence - Savonarola's sermons were calculated to turn even the hardest of the hard (Michaelangelo say) to jelly at the thought of the coming Judgment of mankind. It was long believed that Botticelli had designed these woodcuts. There seems little pictorial evidence in support.


02 a woodcut of a Dominican monk preaching from Marcus Von Weida, Der Spiegel hochloblicher Bruderschaft der Rosenkrantz Mari e, printed in Leipzig in 1515.  
Savonarola resisting the blandishments of the Evil One.
 
03 The preacher being addressed by the Temptor.

04 The image of the penitent at Confession, from T.F.Dibdin's A Bibliograpical, Antiquarian and

Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Bulmer, for the author, London 1821- 3.
 
05 From Joseph Grego's Rowlandson the Caricaturist , Chatto and Windus, London 1880. A drawing after a print by Thomas Rowlandson dated 1785. "An Essay on the Sublime and Beautiful" the Lay Preacher

06 A Portrait of Savonarola.

illustration to a book of texts by Savonarola c1500

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ORATORY Makers of Speeches

above H.M.Bateman's cartoon for the British magazine The Tatler, c 1925, captioned "A Little Disinfectant", rather summing up the standard of political comment among British cartoonists between the wars.


A Political Fancy. From Henry Alken's series SYMPTOMS (1822) The prints are 19 x 24cms.
 
 
 "Our Mr.Lloyd George on Tour - "That's 'im Next the Mayor" - Well it ain't much like 'is pictures" - "Ah, but you wait till you 'ear 'im speak."from the same volume as the above, Punch August 4th, 1909 p.75 18 x 25cms. And a direct reflection of the gathering unease at the power of the amplified voice to stir up the working classes. Punch explains (as it was very often wont to do) "Certain ministers, including the Chancellor of the Exchequer , are reported to have spoken their political principles into a gramophone."

01 Martin Lewis The Orator - Madison Square , etching, 25 x 33cms

02 Punch February 24th 1909 p.128 18 x 25cms. There was a particular fear of the power of the amplified speaker in the early years of this century, just before the electrical amplification of the voice. Here a rather leaden drawing of a tale obviously told, by Bernard Partridge.

03 C.R.W.Nevinson, The Workers (Strike Demonstration) lithograph 1919, 17 x 25cms. Nevinson himself had a stony dislike of anything that smacked of Democracy and a Mass Movement. The sepulchral building behind the speakers is ominous and was meant to be."Nevinson is radically anti-democratic, 'What,' he asks,' has anybody yet succeeded in teaching a mob ? A mob will always be somebody's tool Better a thousand times that it should be the tool of the hereditory and futile aristocrat than that of the tedious and inane professional agitator. The great majority of mankind will inevitably and invariably be fools ..." K.Hare, London's Latin Quarter 1926 of the painter C.R.W.Nevinson.
Nevinson, 1914 - 1918.
  
04 advert for Republican Steel July 1951 read the copy for some characteristic observations about Socialism in America

05 One of the Cuckoos listed by Baden Powell liable to distort a young man's directions in life, from Rovering to Success , Herbert Jenkins, London undated , my edition inscribed 1929. In the Market...."such was the power of the tub thumper that I only escaped by the skin of my teeth" and in the Political Arena..."the good, loud voiced political orator... with the gift of the gab he will bag at one go a whole crowd of open-mouthed wandering lads..."

"They fall like ripe plums to his shake and start forthwith to learn either The Red Flag or By Jingo if we do .., according as he is preaching red-hot communism or aggressive imperialism. He hypnotises the whole herd. But he cannot mesmerise the individual fellow who doesn't mean to be carried away by the rest." p.137
 

06 One of the many handbooks available in the first fifteen years of the century advising the politician, the after-dinner speaker and the rabble rouser how to make more effective use of the voice and the brain in making speeches.


07 The real thing, the pioneer American socialist Eugene Debs at work in the USA , c 1910 with a full repertoire of dynamic gestures.

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PEDAGOGY .... AND RECITATION


two images from from Albert Millaud, Physiologies Parisiennes, Librairie Illustré,
Paris undated c1898 page size 19 x 27 cms
 
 
TOP ROW


01 from Urban Wyss' Copybook Zurich 1549
 
 
J. von Hamel, Insignamento mutuo... Ancona 1820. An Italian edition publishing the educational theories of Bell and Lancaster, whereby the senior pupils teach smaller groups of the younger pupils. This intriguing last image has a strong feeling of the Last Supper.
 

Joseph Lancaster, The British System of Education, pamphlet 1810.

 

BOTTOM ROW

from B.H.Smart, The Practice of Elocution , London 1832
 from Voice Speech and Gesture a handbook for declamation published in London in 1897, this article on the Zones of Gesture by Hugh Campbell.
See George Taylor, Players and Performances in the Victorian Theatre Manchester Univ.Press, Manchester, 1989
Dickens reads to his adoring public.
 undated but certainly 1940, and a good image of the comedian's delivery with audience in view. As important to show the listener as the narrator...
 
 Punch May 26th 1909 p.367, full page illustration
1. A Young Blood
2. A Racing Man
3. A Member of Parliament
4. An Actor Manager.)

 

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Gluyas Williams, Raconteurs c1938