GEORGE GIUSTI

for fortune

FORTUNE COVERS
FORTUNE illustration December 1949 Natural Gas - Whoosh

FORTUNE The hormones at a glance May 1951

FORTUNE FEB.1949, portrait and copy
FORTUNE cover FEB.1949
LETTER TO PHIL BEARD

GRAPHIS

GRAPHIS NO 99 1955
GRAPHIS NO 26 1949
ART AND INDUSTRY September 1939

COMMERCIAL WORK

GALLERY ONE
GALLERY TWO
DAVISON CHEMICAL CORP.
PLOVER BOND 1960 (SINGLE)
MERRITT CHAPMAN PAINTS (single)
RAYTHEON "I'll be phoning you..."(single)

ETHYL, What Goes up Must Come Down, FORTUNE Dec 1942

VICTORY PLASTICS March 1945

 

FIRST NATIONAL

NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK (2)
FIRST NATIONAL CITY BANK, ELECTRIC POWER 1952
FIRST NATIONAL Leisure time
 

EDITORIAL

A.D.C. ANNUAL, JACKET 1954
INTERIORS MAGAZINE 1952

SOURCES

  re Giusti Forty Illustrators, ERNEST WATSON 1948
BURTIN ON GIUSTI

 

 

EARLIER SCREEN

 

George Giusti (1908-1990) trained at the Reale Accademia e Belle Arti in Milan. He worked in Lugano before opening his own studio in Zurich. In 1938 he emigrated to the United States, beginning a long and productive career as a designer His style changes regualrly to adapt to the tenor of the times, later loosing some of his simple directness kin modish flourish.

"Giusti works almost exclusively in tempera. He uses the airbrush but with considerable reserve. He is careful not to lose the distinction of his own incisive brushline. Usually he carries his designs as far as possible with the sable brush, then applies the airbrush where needed for soft gradations and very smooth tones. He uses colored inks in his airbrush, spraying them over the tempera."See E.W.Watson, FORTY Illustrators and How They Work , Watson Guptill 1946, for a well illustrated survey of Giusti's work.

 

Morse, Edward S. “The Man Who Signs His Work Giusti,” CA: The Magazine of the Communication Arts, July/August 1965, pp. 24-35
Remington, R. Roger. “Remembering George Giusti,” Graphis, May/June 1993, pp. 96-101.

His papers are lodged with Roger Remington at the Rochester Institute of Technology and give a glimpse of the huge range of his output, including his work in sculpture.

 

Giusti first worked for FORTUNE in 1941 three years after coming to America. He had had a successful career in advertising in Milan and Zurich. He found early success in posters and design . An early success was working with Herbert Matter on the Swiss Pavilion for the 1939 New York World’s Fair. Allied to terrific visual flair was an intelligent understanding of mechanical structures which he could express simply but accurately for the reader.